Information on theses at the ProCo-Research Group

We put together all relevant information on signing up and completing a thesis in a Moodle course. It is mandatory to look at the information carefully before contacting us.

Follow this link for all information on ProCo-Theses

We oversee theses on the following fields, among others. In the following, you will find proposed topics as well as open topics for theses. You are free to suggest your own topics as well. In general, it is also possible to write theses in cooperation with companies.

We expect you to think about a possible focus of your thesis in the run-up to a first meeting.

Ausgeschriebene Themen für Abschlussarbeiten

Action Potential of Social Media for Collective Action

Target Group:

Bachelor / Master

Requirements:

Quantitative or qualitative analyses

Content:

Fridays for Future, MeToo and Black Lives Matter are just a few examples of social movements that have been able to make a strong impact through social media. In the literature, there are already some case studies of social media use by individual social movements on specific platforms (primarily Twitter). The interaction of different social media platforms and their use for different roles within social movements has received little attention so far.

With the help of Affordance Theory, the following research questions could be answered in your thesis:

  • How do the affordances (action potentials) of different social media platforms enable collective action?
  • How do different types of actors in social movements perceive and actualize social media affordances (action potentials) for collective action?

Literature:

  • Sæbø, Ø., Federici, T., & Braccini, A. M. (2020). Combining Social Media Affordances for Organising Collective Action. Information Systems Journal, 1-34.
  • Ray, D. & Tarafdar, M., (2017). How does Twitter influence Social Movement?. European Conference on Information Systems, Guimarães, Portugal.
  • Brünker, F., Wischnewski, M., Mirbabaie, M., & Meinert, J. (2020). The Role of Social Media during Social Movements – Observations from the #metoo Debate on Twitter. Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Maui, Hawaii.

Kontakt:

Jennifer Fromm

Parasocial Interactions in Corporate Podcasting

Target Group:

Bachelor, Master

Requirements:

Experimental Design

Content:

The future belongs to voice-based information. Maybe. In this context, however, podcasts are increasingly taking root in education, entertainment, and business communication. In mainstream literature, they have been repeatedly associated with the concept of parasocial interactions and relationships. Little research has been conducted to examine such experiences in the context of brand communication via podcasts. Based on the theoretical background of the two-level model of parasocial interactions, the goal of this thesis is to perform an experiment with between-subject design, in which participants listen to modified podcast episodes. The aim of this bachelor or master thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of interactions as a result of podcast consumption and its impact on brand communication.

Literature:

  • Swiatek, L. (2018). The podcast as an intimate bridging medium. In: Podcasting. New Aural Cultures and Digital Media. Ed. by D. Llinares, N. Fox & R. Berry, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 173-187.
  • Perks, L. G. and Turner, J. S. (2018). Podcasts and productivity: A qualitative uses and gratifications study. Mass Communication and Society, 22(1), 1-21.
  • Hartmann, T. and Goldhoorn, C. (2011). Horton and Wohl revisited: Exploring viewers' experience of parasocial interaction. Journal of Communication, 61(6), 1104–1121.
  • Horton, D. and Wohl, R. R. (1956). Mass communication and para-social interaction: Observations on intimacy at a distance. Psychiatry, 19(3), 215-229.

Contact:

Julian Marx

Ethics of Social Media Analytics

Target Group:

Master

Requirements:

Planning and conducting of expert interviews

Content:

Social Media Analytics is an emerging interdisciplinary research field that aims on combining, extending, and adapting methods for analysis of social media data. On the one hand, it can support Information Systems and other research disciplines to answer their research questions and on the other hand it helps to provide architectural designs as well as solution frameworks for new social media- based applications and information systems. SMA aims to improve relevant tasks such as the tracking, preparation, and analysis as well as the aggregation, visualization, and interpretation of social media data. SMA enables researchers and practitioners to address important questions including, for example, how information diffuses through social media or how predictions about future behavior can be made based on social media data.

There are many fields which highly benefited from the use of social media analytics. For instance political parties, which used data analyzed their voters and directly targeted them, emergency agencies, which used social media analytics to learn more about crisis events to improve their strategies, or journalists who used social media analytics to learn what their audience wants to consume and with which content they mostly engage with.

However, several data scandals as e.g. the Cambridge Analytics Scandal on Facebook lead to a huge discussion about morals on social media and the ethics of social media and big data analysis. The EU responded in 2018 with the GDPR, the General Data protection Regulation which aims at protecting the users from misuse of their data. This new regulation made the tracking, storage and analysis of personal data online way more difficult. However, ethical questions remain unanswered and thus leaves a lot of open research questions for scientists.

The aim of this master thesis will be the elaboration of the ethical challenges which arise in the process of social media analytics. The analysis will consider all three steps of social media analytics process: the tracking, preparation and analysis. The leading question will be “Which role does ethics play in the process of social media analytics?” It won’t be the aim of this thesis to show what the GDPR states about certain ethical pitfalls, but much more: “What should researchers and practitioners do to use SMA ethically?” The thesis should successfully highlight the tension between e.g. the data protection rights of the individuals and the aim to do research for a greater good.

For the thesis the interview guidelines need to be developed on a deductive and inductive basis, experts need to be recruited and the interviews need to be conducted, transcribed and analyzed with help of a reliable coding scheme. If necessary the supervisor will assist the student in the process of expert recruitment.

Literature:

  • Mittelstadt et al. (2016): The ethics of algorithms: Mapping the Debate. Big Data & Society, p. 1-21.
  • Someh et al. (2019). Ethical Issues in Big Data Analytics: A Stakeholder Perspective. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 44. https://doi.org/10.17705/1CAIS.04434
  • Stieglitz et al. (2014): Social Media Analytics - An Interdisciplinary Approach and Its Implications for Information Systems. Bus. Inf. Syst. Eng. 6, 89–96 (2014).
  • Zarsky (2016) The trouble with algorithmic decisions an analytic road map to examine efficiency and fairness in automated ad opaque decision making. Science, Technology and Human Values 41 (1), p. 118-132.

Contact:

Anna-Katharina Jung

Virtual Assistants in Organizations - The Return of Social Loafing?

Target Group:

Bachelor/Master

Requirements:

Experiment, Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis

Content:

Since Maximilien Ringelmann’s first experiment in 1913, to suggest a possible decrement in individual motivation as a result of working in a group (Karau & Williams, 1993, cited in Kravitz & Martin, 1986), social loafing (SL) has been researched frequently. SL is defined as “the reduction in motivation and effort when individuals work collectively compared with when they work individually” (Karau & Williams, 1993) and can generally be explained by 4 main theories (Vaghefi & Lapointe, 2012): Social Impact Theory (Latané et al., 1979), Free Rider Theory (Albanese & Van Fleet, 1985), Social Comparison Theory (Festinger, 1954; Goethals & Darley, 1987), as well as Theory of Social Compensation (Williams & Karau, 1991).

Within organizations, information systems (IS) research focused on the individual contribution (Bandura 1997) as well as the individual performance (Lount & Wilk, 2014) and is further divided into two main streams: determinants and their influence (e.g. Chidambaram & Tung, 2005; Dennis et al., 2005) as well as negative impacts on performance and its reduction (e.g. Shepperd, 1995; Suleiman & Watson, 2008). However, the role of information technology (IT) artifacts in the emergence of SL has been largely ignored (Vaghefi & Lapointe, 2012).

Zum derzeitigen Zeitpunkt ist Virtual Reality ein neuer Hype und es wird vorhergesagt, dass Virtual Reality Meetings die Zukunft sein werden. Blickt man jedoch wieder in die Vergangenheit zurück, stellt man fest, dass es denselben Hype bereits in den 90ern gab. Und damals hat Virtual Reality sich nicht am Arbeitsplatz durchsetzen könnten. Es stellt sich die Frage, ob nun die Voraussetzungen gegeben sind, dass sich Virtual Reality durchsetzen kann.

Due to the current development that artificial intelligence (AI) and especially virtual assistants (VAs) are increasingly being introduced in organizations (Alsheiabni, Cheung and Messom, 2019) for assisting employees by tackling repetitive tasks (Frick, 2019) that require the fast retrieval and processing of digital data (Maedche et al., 2016) and understanding of complex interdependencies (Dellermann et al., 2019) it is unclear whether the utilization of VAs also involves negative consequences. The question remains if SL be detected in teams consisting out of employees and VAs. Summarized, this thesis focuses on what influence virtual assistants have on motivation and effort when working collectively with employees compared with employees who work individually.

The collaboration with one or more organizations is possible, as long as the further use of the research data is not limited. The thesis is going to be written in English.

Literature:

  • Albanese, R., and Van Fleet, D. D. 1985. "Rational behavior in groups: The free-riding tendency,” The Academy of Management Review, (10:2), pp. 244–255
  • Alsheiabni, S., Y. Cheung and C. Messom. (2019). “Factors Inhibiting the Adoption of Artificial Intelligence at organizational-level : A Preliminary Investigation.” In: Twenty-fifth Americas Conference on Information Systems (pp. 1–10). Cancun.
  • Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: W.H. Freeman and Company
  • Volkoff, O., & Strong, D. (2013). Critical Realism and Affordances: Theorizing IT-Associated Organizational Change Processes, MIS Quarterly, 37(3), 819-834.
  • Dellermann D, Ebel P, Söllner M, Leimeister JM (2019) Hybrid Intelligence. Bus Inf Syst Eng. doi: 10.1007/s12599-019-00595-2
  • Dennis, A. R., Pinsonneault, A., McNamara Hilmer, K., Barki, H., Gallupe, B., Huber, M., and Bellavance, F. 2005. "Patterns in Electronic Brainstorming.,” International Journal of e-Collaboration, (1:4), pp.38–57.
  • Festinger, L. 1954. "A theory of social comparison processes,” Human Relations, 7, pp.117-140
  • Frick NRJ, Brünker F, Ross B, Stieglitz S (2019) Towards Successful Collaboration: Design Guidelines for AI-based Services enriching Information Systems in Organisations. Australas Conf Inf Syst. 2019.

Contact:

Nicholas Frick

Virtual Collaboration Throughout Time – The Changing Role of Technology?

Target Group:

Master

Requirements:

Semi-structured expert interviews and/or focus group interviews

Inhalte:

In 1970 the US-American telephone company AT&T introduced the Picturephone with much effort. They developed a videophone that American customers knew from dozens of science fiction series and allegedly wanted urgently, according to surveys. The market launch was a terrific flop. In retrospect, one came to the conclusion that it was unpleasant for people at that time to reveal a piece of their privacy through video telephony. Even in their offices, they did not want their conversation partners to look inside. This cultural habit is now slowly changing. At least the success of Skype testifies to it. In this respect, video telephony is a good example of how radical innovations can be ahead of their time and only be successful decades later because cultural conditions have developed further.

Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are also technologies that are currently on everyone's lips. VR, for example, has existed since the 1960s. In the 90s there was a first hype and experts were sure "VR will prevail!” In the end, this did not happen at least in the 90s and today it can be observed that statements from the past are repeated. Even today the equipment is described as too heavy, motion sickness is a big topic and the lack of mature professional applications is criticized. The question arises whether VR will disappear again or whether it will finally assert itself this time.

Apart from the constantly improving computer performance, the reasons why technologies often fail several times before they become established are largely unexplored. In this thesis this phenomenon should therefore be examined. Therefore, interviews with people who worked in collaborative processes several decades ago should be conducted. The aim is to find out how these people perceived the role of communication and collaboration technologies in the workplace.

This raises the question of how collaboration processes, team structures, organizational culture and the technologies used have changed over time. The result will be an evaluation framework. The framework could contain evaluation criteria to help companies and researchers assess whether communication and collaboration technologies will be successful in the workplace in the long term and what changes in teams, organizational culture, etc. are necessary.

Literature:

  • Brown, S., Dennis, A. R., & Venkatesh, V. (2010). Predicting Collaboration Technology Use: Integrating Technology Adoption and Collaboration Research. Journal of Management Information Systems, 27(2), 9-53.
  • Geels, F. W. & Smit, W. A. (2000). Failed Technology Futures: Pitfalls and Lessons from a Historical Survey. Futures, 32, 867-885.
  • Schnaars, S. & Wymbs, C. (2004). On the Persistence of Lackluster Demand – The History of the Videotelephone. Technology Forecasting and Social Change, 71, 197-216.
  • Gooday, G. (1998). Re-Writing the „Book of Blots“: Critical Reflections on Histories of „Technological Failure“. History and Technology: An Historical Journal, 14(4), 265-291.
  • Wohlgenannt, I., Fromm, J., Stieglitz, S., Radianti, J. & Majchrzak, T. A. (2019). Virtual Reality in Higher Education: Preliminary Results from a Design-Science-Research Project. In Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Information Systems Development (ISD), Toulon, France.

Contact:

Lennart Hofeditz

Determining the Ethical Dimensions of Live Streaming: An Explorative Delphi Study

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Planung und Umsetzung einer Online Delphi Studie

Inhalte:

Live streaming services like Facebook Live or Periscope allow their users to broadcast whatever and whenever they want on social media. This recently developed type of real-time broadcasting evokes a number of ethical concerns ranging from privacy, surveillance to intellectual property issues. The most recent example might be the live stream of the Halle antisemitic attack on Twitch by the terrorist.

Yet, despite its growing importance in contemporary society, there has been limited research on the ethical dimensions of live streaming. To close this gap, this thesis seeks to address the research question: What ethical aspects have to be considered for live streaming? To be able to derive holistic ethical norms, which are not limited to specific agents or contexts an Online Delphi study with international experts from seven different fields: ethics, politics, law, journalism, software engineering, platform operators and users will be conducted. While the methodological foundation of the Delphi Study has been developed already, the preparation, execution and analysis of the study needs to be implemented by the student.

The collection and analysis of ethical norms related to live streaming do not only allow the development of a Code of Ethics and an ethical theory but can also serve as a guideline for the design and improvement of live streaming services by Information Systems experts.

Literatur:

  • Jung, Anna-Katharina, Sell, Jennifer Isabelle, Stratmann, Jens (2018): Determining the Ethical Dimensions of Live Streaming: An Explorative Delphi Study. Proceedings of the 26th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS).
  • Skinner, R. et al., 2015. The Delphi Method Research Strategy in Studies of Information Systems. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 37, pp.31–63.
  • Stahl, B.C., 2012. Morality, ethics and reflection: a categorisation of normative researching IS research. Journal of the Association for Information Systems, 13(8), pp.636–656.
  • Stahl, B.C., 2008. Researching Ethics and Morality in Information Systems: Some Guiding Questions. In ICIS 2008 Proceedings. ´
  • Scheibe, K., Fietkiewicz, K.J. & Stock, W.G., 2016. Information Behavior on Social Live Streaming Services. Journal of Information Science Theory and Practice, 4(2).

Kontakt:

Anna-Katharina Jung

Self-Determination and Smart Speakers in Organizations

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Quantitative Analysis

Inhalte:

The utilization of Smart Speakers at home as well as in organizations has increased rapidly over the last few years. Systems like Amazon Alexa, Apple Home Pod and Google Home are physical devices equipped with microphones and virtual assistants with the major goal to assist people with everyday tasks. Therefore, the utilization of Smart Speakers by employees in organizations promise many advantages. Smart Speakers have to listen the environment constantly, to be activated using a particular keyword. Additionally, there has to be a permanent internet connection to send and retrieve information processed by the virtual assistant on the vendors server. However, with the continued spread of Smart Speakers concerns associated with the outlined requirements increase especially when revealing work-related information. Research already focused on different perspectives in this context like Security, Privacy and Trust. However, there is no research how Self-Determination influences the willingness to use Smart Speakers.

The aim of this thesis is to investigate to what extent the three basic psychological needs for Competence, Relatedness and Autonomy influence the use of Smart Speakers in organizations and how Uncertainty Factors affect this effect. To test the hypotheses, an online survey will be conducted with the major aim to verify a developed structural equation model. In this master thesis, the collaboration with organizations is possible, as long as the further use of the research data is not limited.

Literatur:

  • Deci, E. L., Ryan, R. M., Gagné, M., Leone, D. R., Usunov, J., & Kornazheva, B. P. (2001). Need Satisfaction, Motivation, and Well-Being in the Work Organizations of a Former Eastern Bloc Country: A Cross-Cultural Study of Self-Determination. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 27(8), 930–942. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167201278002
  • H. Ernst, Claus-Peter. (2015). Risk Hurts Fun: The Influence of Perceived Privacy Risk on Social Network Site Usage. 10.1007/978-3-658-09918-3_4.
  • Hoy, Matthew. (2018). Alexa, Siri, Cortana, and More: An Introduction to Voice Assistants. Medical Reference Services Quarterly. 37. 81-88. 10.1080/02763869.2018.1404391.
  • Orr, Douglas & Sanchez, Laura. (2018). Alexa , did you get that? Determining the evidentiary value of data stored by the Amazon® Echo. Digital Investigation. 24. 10.1016/j.diin.2017.12.002
  • Renzl, Birgit. (2008). Trust in management and knowledge sharing: The mediating effects of fear and knowledge documentation. Omega. 36. 206-220. 10.1016/j.omega.2006.06.005.

Kontakt:

Nicholas Frick

Design Principles für Bot-Anwendungen in der Krisenkommunikation

Zielgruppe:

Bachelor/Master

Anforderungen:

Interviews und qualitative Inhaltsanalyse

Inhalte:

Seit der Erfindung der ersten Computer wurden Softwareroboter (Bots) eingesetzt, um Menschen von verschiedenen Aufgaben zu entlasten. Auch in der Krisenkommunikation während Naturkatastrophen wurden bereits Anwendungsmöglichkeiten getestet. Beispielsweise verwendeten Disaster Medical Assistant Teams (DMATs) Chatbots während des Kamamoto-Erdbebens in Japan im Jahr 2016 für ihre Social Media-Kommunikation, um die Teams zu koordinieren.

Insgesamt ist die Erforschung von Bots in der Krisenkommunikation jedoch noch sehr begrenzt. Existierende Beispiele beschränken sich auf einfache Erdbebenwarnungsbots und einfache Chatbot-Anwendungen. In anderen Bereichen, wie dem Gesundheitswesen, wurden bereits weitaus komplexere Botanwendungen getestet. Mögliche Anwendungsfelder für Bots in der Krisenkommunikation wurden bereits identifiziert, jedoch mangelt es an detaillierteren Untersuchungen und Umsetzungen.

Ziel dieser Arbeit ist es deshalb, mittels Experteninterviews mit anschließender qualitativer Inhaltsanalyse, Design Principles für die Entwicklung einer komplexen Bot-Anwendung zu identifizieren. Es soll untersucht werden, welche Anforderungen sowohl Hilfsorganisationen als auch Endnutzer an Chatbots, Social Bots oder sonstige Bot-Typen in der Krisenkommunikation stellen. Mögliche interessante Anwendungsfelder sind Bots zur automatisierten Nachrichtenübersetzung in verschiedene Sprachen, Kundenservice- und Feedback-Bots, Anwendungen für Smart-Speaker, Emergency-Report-Bots, Social-Media-Monitoring-Bots, Recruitment-Bots oder Bots, die Falschinformationen automatisiert bekämpfen.

Literatur:

  • Brachten, F., Mirbabaie, M., Stieglitz, S., Berger, O., Bludau, S. & Schrickel, K. (2018). Threat or Opportunity? - Examining Social Bots in Social Media Crisis Communication. In: Proceedings of the 29th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (ACIS).
  • Hofeditz, L., Ehnis, C., Bunker, D., Brachten, F., & Stieglitz, S. (2019). Meaningful use of social bots? Possible Applications in Crisis Communication During Disasters. In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS).
  • Kawai, T., Kambara, H., Matsumura, K., Noma, H., Sugiyama, O., Shimoto, M., … Kuroda, T. (2018). Design and Implementation of a Social Networking Service-Based Application for Supporting Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (pp. 165–172). Springer, Cham. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-59397-5_18
  • Stieglitz, S., Brachten, F., Ross, B., & Jung, A.-K. (2017). Do Social Bots Dream of Electric Sheep? A Categorisation of Social Media Bot Accounts. Proceedings of the Australasian Conference on Information Systems (ACIS).

Kontakt:

Lennart Hofeditz

Anforderungen an die Campuscloud sciebo zur Verbesserung der Akzeptanz

Zielgruppe:

Bachelor/Master

Anforderungen:

Interviews und qualitative Inhaltsanalyse

Inhalte:

Mit inzwischen ca. 90.000 Nutzern ist der Kollaborations- und Speicherdienst „sciebo“ (science box) eine anerkannte Plattform zum Management von Forschungsdaten für Wissenschaftler und Studierende an Hochschulen in NRW. Obwohl die Anzahl der Mitglieder der Plattform stark zunimmt, steigt die Anzahl der aktiven Nutzer nur sehr gering.

Ein möglicher Grund ist die zu starke Fokussierung auf technische Anforderungen beim Design der Plattform und die geringe Miteinbeziehung von nicht-technischen Aspekten. Hinzu kommt, dass Wissenschaftler verschiedener Disziplinen spezielle Programme und Tools nutzen, welche sich möglicherweise schlecht mit der Campuscloud sciebo verknüpfen lassen.

Vorausgegangene Studien untersuchten bereits die technischen und nicht-technischen Barrieren und die Akzeptanz gegenüber ähnlichen Systemen. Mögliche Weiterentwicklungen der Campuscloud sciebo sind jedoch weitestgehend unerforscht.

Ziel dieser Arbeit ist es deshalb, eine Anforderungsanalyse zur Verbesserung der sciebo-Plattform zu erstellen. Es soll untersucht werden, welche Probleme und Hindernisse bei der individuellen Arbeit mit Forschungsdaten auftreten und wie die Akzeptanz von sciebo als Service erhöht werden kann. Dazu soll zunächst ein entsprechendes Literatur-Review erstellt werden, um dann anschließend in Experteninterviews mit Forschenden verschiedener Disziplinen tiefere Erkenntnisse zu gewinnen.

Literatur:

  • Kim, Y., and Zhang, P. 2015. “Understanding data sharing behaviors of STEM researchers: The roles of attitudes, norms, and data repositories,” Library & Information Science Research, (37:3), pp. 189–200 (doi: 10.1016/J.LISR.2015.04.006).
  • Vogl R., Angenent H., Rudolph D., Thoring A., Schild C., Stieglitz S. and Meske C. 2015. „sciebo – the Campuscloud for NRW”, European Journal of Higher Education IT (EJHEIT) (2:3), pp. 1-12. (Winner of the Elite Award for Excellence).
  • Vogl, R., Rudolph, D., Thoring, A., Angenent, H., Stieglitz, S., & Meske, C. (2016). How to build a cloud storage service for half a million users in higher education: Challenges met and solutions found. Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2016–March, 5328–5337. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2016.658
  • Wilms, K., Brenger, B., López, A., Rehwald, S. (2018). Open Data in Higher Education – What Prevents Researchers from Sharing Research Data?. In: Proceedings of the 39th International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS).
  • Wilms, K., Meske, C., Stieglitz, S., Decker, H., Fröhlich, L., Jendrosch, N., Schaulies, S., Vogl, R. and Rudolph, D. (2017). Digital Transformation in Higher Education – New Cohorts, New Requirements?. In: Proceedings of the 23rd Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS)

Kontakt:

Lennart Hofeditz

Augmented-Reality-Integration von Social-Media-Daten ins Krisenmanagement

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Interviews und qualitative Inhaltsanalyse

Inhalte:

In Krisensituationen spielen Mitarbeiter in Einsatzleitstellen eine zentrale Rolle für die Koordination von verfügbaren Ressourcen und Einsatzkräften. Für ihre Aufgabe müssen sie eine Vielzahl an Informationen verarbeiten, die auf mehreren Bildschirmen visualisiert werden. Dazu gehören beispielsweise digitale Karten der betroffenen Region, eine Übersicht über die verfügbaren Einsatzkräfte in der Nähe sowie die aktuelle Berichterstattung in den Nachrichtenmedien. In letzter Zeit wird in der Forschung auch vermehrt das Potenzial von Social Media als zusätzliche Informationsquelle für das Krisenmanagement diskutiert. So könnten insbesondere Posts von Augenzeugen eine wertvolle Ergänzung zu traditionellen Informationsquellen darstellen. Da Mitarbeiter in Einsatzleitstellen jedoch bereits eine Vielzahl an Informationen verarbeiten müssen, stellt sich die Frage, ob die Visualisierung durch Augmented Reality verbessert werden könnte.

Im Rahmen der Masterarbeit sollen Interviews mit Mitarbeitern in Einsatzleitstellen geführt werden. Ziel der Interviews ist es ein tieferes Verständnis für die Arbeitsabläufe und Entscheidungsprozesse in Einsatzleitstellen zu entwickeln. Dabei soll insbesondere untersucht werden, welche Arten von Social-Media-Daten von den Mitarbeitern als nützlich bewertet werden und wie diese mittels Augmented Reality visualisiert werden könnten. Bestehende Interviewkontakte sind keine Voraussetzung, es sollte aber die Bereitschaft bestehen sich selbstständig um Interviewkontakte zu bemühen.

Literatur:

  • Stieglitz, S., Mirbabaie, M., Fromm, J. & Melzer, S. (2018). The Adoption of Social Media Analytics for Crisis Management – Challenges and Opportunities. In Proceedings of the 26th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), Portsmouth, UK.
  • Cameron, M. A., Power, R., Robinson, B. & Yin, J. (2012). Emergency Situation Awareness from Twitter for Crisis Management. In Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on World Wide Web, 695-698.
  • Balduini, M., Celino, I., Dell’Aglio, D., Della Valle, E., Huang, Y., Lee, T., ... & Tresp, V. (2012). BOTTARI: An Augmented Reality Mobile Application to Deliver Personalized and Location-Based Recommendations by Continuous Analysis of Social Media Streams. Web Semantics: Science, Services and Agents on the World Wide Web, 16, 33-41.

Kontakt:

Jennifer Fromm

Connective Action and Disaster Communication

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Social Media Analytics, Qualitative Analyses

Inhalte:

Movements such as the Arab Spring, Occupy Wall Street and other large-scale protests have used digital media in ways that go beyond sending and receiving messages. The same applies to natural disasters, and human induced crises. This thesis aims to examine the public dynamics that emerge when communication becomes a part of a collective movement. We need to understand action networks and their requirements. In the literature, one can distinguish between the logic of collective action and the formation of collective identities, and the less prominent logic of connective action. It is primarily based on personalized content sharing across media networks. By analyzing social media communication data of a recent crisis case, the thesis shall investigate how connective action during disaster communication comes to play. The thesis involves the analysis of one or more large-scale datasets by means of social network analysis, sentiment, and content analysis.

Literatur:

  • Philip Pond, Jeff Lewis. (2019) Riots and Twitter: connective politics, social media and framing discourses in the digital public sphere. Information, Communication & Society 22:2, pages 213-231.
  • Alex Ingrams. (2017) Connective action and the echo chamber of ideology: Testing a model of social media use and attitudes toward the role of government. Journal of Information Technology & Politics14:1, pages 1-15.
  • Mette Mortensen. (2015) Connective witnessing: Reconfiguring the relationship between the individual and the collective. Information, Communication & Society 18:11, pages 1393-1406.

Kontakt:

Dr. Milad Mirbabaie

Conversational Agents in Collaboration

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Systematic Literature Review, Qualitative Analyses

Inhalte:

Companies, as well as other organizations, compete on a market which is characterized by shortened product cycles, requiring them to quickly develop new and innovative products and services. Furthermore, organizations are increasingly influenced by the chances and challenges of digitization. Concurrently, employees are confronted with issues of increasing complexity. A proven and effective way of conquering complexity is collaboration. Collaborative methods such as Design Thinking, require adequate moderation and management (e.g. of tasks). These tasks can potentially be carried out by conversational agents, computer programs which are able to communicate with human users through the use of written or spoken natural language. Research has demonstrated such potential e.g. in the context of software development, collaborative searching tasks, workflow and task management, as well as innovation. As such, several additional contexts could benefit from the inclusion of conversational agents into collaborative processes. Equivalent to the whole research field of conversational agents, research regarding the inclusion of CAs in collaborative tasks is characterized by a high level of heterogeneity. As such, there is a need for a systematization of existing concepts and systems based on a systematic literature review and or expert interviews, resulting e.g. in the design of a (conceptual) framework. Furthermore, a practical implementation can be carried out via the development of new concepts and prototypical systems.

Literatur:

  • Porcheron, M., Fischer, J.E., McGregor, M., Brown, B., Luger, E., Candello, H., O’Hara, K., 2017. Talking with Conversational Agents in Collaborative Action, in: Companion of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing - CSCW ’17 Companion.
  • Just, J.E., Cornwell, M.R., Huhns, M.N., 2005. Facilitating Human Collaboration with Agents, in: Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. p. 71a.
  • Gnewuch, U., Morana, S., Maedche, A., 2017. Towards Designing Cooperative and Social Conversational Agents for Customer Service, in: Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS). pp. 1–13.

Kontakt:

Dr. Milad Mirbabaie

Conversational Agents and Ethics

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Quantitative or qualitative analyses

Inhalte:

Society as a whole, as well as organizations in particular are increasingly influenced and shaped by information technology. Concurrently, the mode of interaction with such systems is changing. One such mode, conversational agents, enable interaction through the use of natural written (e.g. Chatbots) or spoken (e.g. Amazon Alexa) language and support a wide range of tasks in domains such as e-commerce, education, health or professional collaboration. The inclusion of conversational agents into human interactions, e.g. in collaborative endeavors, rise questions on privacy. These are further emphasized by the requirement of a constant activity of conversational agents in order for them to be able to pick up cues. Hence, the role of ethics in the context of conversational agents has to be sufficiently clarified. This requires the determination of the status quo regarding ethics in currently used conversational agent applications as well as the development of ethical standards, e.g. in the form of best practices, which can be applied in existing applications, as well as future development. Research can include qualitative methods such as systematic literature review, as well as interviews with private users and/or domain experts, and quantitative methods (survey).

Literatur:

  • Porcheron, M., Fischer, J.E., McGregor, M., Brown, B., Luger, E., Candello, H., O’Hara, K., 2017. Talking with Conversational Agents in Collaborative Action, in: Companion of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing - CSCW ’17 Companion.
  • Just, J.E., Cornwell, M.R., Huhns, M.N., 2005. Facilitating Human Collaboration with Agents, in: Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. p. 71a.
  • Gnewuch, U., Morana, S., Maedche, A., 2017. Towards Designing Cooperative and Social Conversational Agents for Customer Service, in: Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS). pp. 1–13.

Kontakt:

Dr. Milad Mirbabaie

Fake News: Nutrition Label

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Quantitative or qualitative analyses

Inhalte:

Internet media such as publicly and privately-run news sites, blogs, wikis and social media such as Facebook and Twitter are increasingly used as the primary source of different kinds of information. While such media have disruptively changed the way, news are produced and distributed, concurrently the assessment of legitimacy of content distributed through such media has become increasingly difficult. As such, the term „fake news“ has gained popularity, albeit in negative connotation, as fake news have been linked with influencing public opinion e.g. in the context of elections. As important as ways to effectively identifying fake news are, as complex such a task is. A way of determining legitimacy are nutritional labels (Fuhr et al., 2018), which provide a range of characteristics of text documents, such as factuality, virality, opinion, controversy, authority, technicality, and topicality (Fuhr et al., 2018), thus empowering the consumer to perceive the legitimacy of online media. These characteristics are determined based on different methods of natural language processing, which include rule-based as well as machine learning approaches, as well as network analysis amongst others. As such, qualitative, as well as quantitative methods are applied. Social media, such as Facebook or Twitter, offer a large and ever-growing corpus of different kinds of information, partly fake in nature. As such, social media concurrently provides a microcosm, in which fake information can be observed, as well as a data basis, on which characteristics of a “nutrition label” can be applied and evaluated.

Literatur:

  • Fuhr, Norbert (2018). An Information Nutritional Label for Online Documents, ACM SIGIR Forum, v.51 n.3, 1-19.
  • Ross, Björn; Jung, Anna-Katharina; Heisel, Jennifer; Stieglitz, Stefan (2018). Fake News on Social Media: The (In)Effectiveness of Warning Messages. In: Proceedings of the 39th International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS).
  • Allcott, H., and Gentzkow, M. 2017. “Social Media and Fake News in the 2016 Election,” Journal of Economic Perspectives , (31:2), pp. 211–236, May 24.

Kontakt:

Dr. Milad Mirbabaie

Heterogeneity of Terminology: Conversational Agents

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Systematic Literature Review

Inhalte:

Conversational agents, computer programs which are able to communicate with human users through the use of written or spoken natural language, are increasingly applied in a wide range of contexts such as e-commerce, education, health or collaboration. Depending on the context, conversational agents are able to assist the user in specific tasks, e.g. information retrieval, moderation, planning or entertainment among others. The variety of use cases of conversational agents, as well as research in several disciplines, results in a rather high heterogeneity of terminology and definitions. In scientific literature, entities which match the definition mentioned above, are mentioned under the terms of conversational agents, chat bots, virtual agents or intelligent agents, virtual assistants among others. This heterogeneity renders the assessment of a status quo in CA-research an elaborate and complex task, impeding progress. As such, a systematization of research regarding CAs could be highly beneficial to the field of CAs. This task can be performed based on a systematic literature review of existing literature regarding CAs in different use contexts.

Literatur:

  • Porcheron, M., Fischer, J.E., McGregor, M., Brown, B., Luger, E., Candello, H., O’Hara, K., 2017. Talking with Conversational Agents in Collaborative Action, in: Companion of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing - CSCW ’17 Companion.
  • Just, J.E., Cornwell, M.R., Huhns, M.N., 2005. Facilitating Human Collaboration with Agents, in: Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. p. 71a.
  • Gnewuch, U., Morana, S., Maedche, A., 2017. Towards Designing Cooperative and Social Conversational Agents for Customer Service, in: Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS). pp. 1–13.

Kontakt:

Dr. Milad Mirbabaie

Social Movements

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Social Media Analytics, Qualitative Analysen

Inhalte:

Social Media have had a significant impact on the way people interact, communicate and inform themselves. Classic models and theories of human interaction and communication can no longer be universally applied to explain (mass) communication and interaction. Social media enable the rapid and multidirectional exchange of information, thus allowing the addressing of a mass of users at once. Social media facilitates the emergence and formation of social movements or collectives (e.g. based on trending topics e.g. of social or ecological nature) by enabling relatively easy self-organization. Such social movements, which are more of less organized, perform “connective actions”. Thus, new forms of collectives or movements differ from classic analog collectives, which are often centrally organized. As such, the way in which collectives or social movements emerge in social media, as well as their inner workings have yet to be further identified and explained. Possible methods include content analysis, social network analysis and sentiment analysis of twitter data.

Literatur:

  • Tye, M., Leong, C., Tan, F., Tan, B., & Khoo, Y. H. (2018). Social Media for Empowerment in Social Movements: The Case of Malaysia's Grassroots Activism. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 42, 1-19.
  • Ray, Deepa and Tarafdar, Monideepa, (2017). ”How does Twitter influence Social Movement?". In Proceedings of the 25th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), Guimarães, Portugal, June 5-10, pp. 3123-3132
  • Buechler, S. M. (1995). New social movement theories. Sociological Quarterly, 36(3), 441-464.

Kontakt:

Dr. Milad Mirbabaie

Organizational Change in Zeiten von künstlicher Intelligenz

Themenfeld:

Einsatz und Nutzung von Künstlicher Intelligenz in Unternehmen

Zielgruppe:

Bachelor, Master

Anforderungen:

Quantitative oder Qualitative Analysen

Inhalte:

Der Einsatz von Künstlicher Intelligenz bietet ein großes Potential in diversen Unternehmensbereichen. KI-Technologien können z.B. dafür genutzt werden, um bessere und schnellere Entscheidungen zu treffen oder neue Formen von Zusammenarbeit zu schaffen. Schon heute investieren vor allem große Konzerne wie Google, IBM und Amazon in die Entwicklung von KI-Technologien. So hat Google bereits 2017 die Unternehmensstrategie weg von “Mobile first” hin zu “AI first” definiert. Neben der Frage nach einer Unternehmensanwendung, besteht eine der größten Herausforderungen für Unternehmen darin, sich so zu verändern, dass Vorteile von Künstlicher Intelligenz genutzt werden können. Neue Produkte oder Dienstleistungen werden geschaffen, die einerseits die Optimierungen von Geschäftsabläufen versprechen, andererseits aber die Arbeit von Mitarbeitern stark beeinflussen wird. Unternehmen müssen sich tiefgreifend verändern, um wettbewerbsfähig zu bleiben sowie die Tatsache akzeptiert werden, dass mit KI-Technologien zusammengearbeitet werden muss.

Im Rahmen der Abschlussarbeit soll untersucht werden, wie sich Unternehmen bzw. auch IT-Abteilungen ändern müssen, um die Vorteile von Künstlicher Intelligenz nutzen zu können und wie der Widerstand gegen Veränderung möglichst gering gehalten werden kann. Im Rahmen dieser Abschlussarbeit sollen Daten erhoben werden (Quantitative oder Qualitative Analysen sind möglich). Eine Erstellung der Arbeit in Kooperation mit einem Unternehmen ist möglich (Unternehmen kann vermittelt werden), solange die Nutzung der Daten hierdurch nicht eingeschränkt wird.

Literatur

  • Holtel, S. (2016). “Artificial intelligence creates a wicked problem for the enterprise.” Procedia Computer Science, 99, 171–180.
  • Laumer, S. (2011). “Why Do People Reject Technologies – a Literature-Based Discussion of the Phenomena “Resistance To Change” in Information Systems and Managerial Psychology Research.” ECIS 2011 Proceedings, 60.
  • Makridakis, S. (2017). “The forthcoming Artificial Intelligence (AI) revolution: Its impact on society and firms.” Futures, 90, 46–60.
  • Spichalsky, K. (2014). Change Management und Mitarbeiterbefragungen - Konzeptionelle Überlegungen und Empirische Erkenntnisse (Vol. 1.1).
  • Weiner, B. J. (2009). “A theory of organizational readiness for change.” Implementation Science, 4(1), 1–9.

Kontakt:

Nicholas Frick

Open topics

Social Media-Analytics 

  • Automated communication in Social Media -- Contact
  • Sense-making in Social Media Crisis Communication -- Contact
  • Social Bots - Impact and relevance -- Contact
  • Organizational Change in Times of Artificial Intelligence -- Contact & Contact
  • Echo chambers and filter bubbles in social networks -- Contact

Communication and Collaboration

  • Conversational Agents in Virtual Collaboration -- Contact