Informationen zu Abschlussarbeiten am ProCo-Lehrstuhl

Wir haben alle relevanten Informationen zur Anmeldung und zum Verfassen von Abschlussarbeiten in einem Moodle-Kurs zusammengefasst. Es ist absolut erforderlich, dass Sie sich die Informationen genau ansehen, bevor Sie mit uns in Kontakt treten.

Hier gehts zum Moodle Kurs für ProCo-Abschlussarbeiten

Wir betreuen Abschlussarbeiten unter anderem zu den unten genannten Feldern. Im Folgenden finden Sie ausgeschriebene Themen sowie offene Themenfelder für Abschlussarbeiten. Sie können auch eigene Vorschläge für Themen machen. Grundsätzlich ist es auch möglich, Abschlussarbeiten in Kooperation mit Unternehmen zu schreiben.

Es wird erwartet, dass Sie im Vorfeld zu einem ersten Treffen bereits Gedanken über einen möglichen Schwerpunkt Ihrer Arbeit machen.

Ausgeschriebene Themen für Abschlussarbeiten

Join us if you can! Socio-Economic Boundaries of Digital Work

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Expert Interviews/Qualitative Methods

Inhalte:

The digitization of the world of work affects individuals and organizations alike. Across industries, technological and structural progress offers new potential for individuals to re-organize their work independently of time and place. In this context, the popularized catchphrase of ‘digital nomadism’ has become an absorbing blueprint for research on the future of work. However, diigital nomadism is also a lifestyle that is reserved to knowledge workers from Western countries who can leverage geo-arbitrage, that is, earning paychecks from high-income countries while maintaining low living expenses in low-cost countries. Consequently, this thesis aims to explore the boundaries of digital work and digital nomadism with respect to socio-economic framework conditions. To do so, Interviews shall be held with knowledge workers from emerging countries such as Brazil, Uruguay, or Indonesia. Access to interview partners will be provided, but own efforts to recruit additional informants are expected. The thesis will further need a strong theoretical foundation, which can be elaborated by the student.

Literatur:

  • Prester, J., D. Cecez-Kecmanovic, and D. Schlagwein, “Becoming a digital nomad: Identity emergence in the flow of practice”, 40th International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2019, (2019)
  • Richter, A., P. Heinrich, A. Stocker, and G. Schwabe, “Digital Work Design”, Business & Information Systems Engineering 60(3), 2018, pp. 259–264.
  • Schlagwein, D., and M.H. Jarrahi, “The Mobilities of Digital Work: The Case of Digital Nomadism”, ECIS 2020 Research-in-Progress Papers, 89, 2020.
  • Wang, B., D. Schlagwein, D. Cecez-Kecmanovic, and M.C. Cahalane, “Beyond the Factory Paradigm: Digital Nomadism and the Digital Future(s) of Knowledge Work Post-COVID-19 Dialectical Reasoning for Envisioning the Future” Journal of the Association for Information Systems 21(6), 2020, pp. 1379-1401.

Kontakt:

Julian Marx

Supporting Ethical Decision Making in Recruiting Processes Through Virtual Assistants in Digital Work

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Online Experiment / Onlinestudie

Inhalte:

Even prior to Amazon’s discriminatory human resources (HR) software or Microsoft’s racist chatbot, the dangerous sides of artificial intelligence (AI) have become points of public and scholarly relevance as well as interest (Dastin 2018). With AI-based technologies becoming more capable (Loebbecke and Picot 2015), they have become a key driver of digitalization (Verweij and Rao 2017), significantly influencing and transforming organizations. Business organizations are facing challenges regarding the opportunities and consequences of an increasingly AI-based economy (Russell and Norvig 2016).

In this context, research often addresses ethical principles for AI, with the goal of not harming humans, not discriminating, and not being biased (Floridi et al., 2018; Yampolskiy 2016). However, events such as the VW emissions scandal have shown that unethical decisions are often made by humans (Stieglitz et al., 2019). Even in the near future, AI-based systems will not yet act fully autonomously; rather, they will assist humans in their work (Mirbabaie et al., 2021). Therefore, the question arises how AI-based assistant systems can guide humans to make ethical decisions (Brendel et al., 2021).

One process where unethical behavior can often be observed in companies is the hiring process of new employees (Dastin 2018). In some cases, women are less likely to be hired, certain minority groups are discriminated against in the recruitment process, or there is little overall transparency about the hiring process.
This work thus aims to examine how AI-based assistance systems can encourage people to make ethical decisions in the hiring process. For this purpose, an (online) experiment is to be conducted in which participants in two different groups are supposed to make hiring decisions together with a virtual assistant. In one of the two groups, the virtual assistant will use digital nudging to encourage the participants to make ethical decisions.
The goal of the work is to gain knowledge about how people can make ethical decisions at work by applying AI-based assistance systems.

Literatur:

  • Brendel, A. B., Mirbabaie, M., Lembcke, T., & Hofeditz, L. (2021). Ethical Management of Artificial Intelligence. Sustainability, 13(4), 1974; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041974.
  • Dastin, J. 2018. “Amazon Scraps Secret AI Recruiting Tool That Showed Bias against Women,” Reuters. (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-amazon-com-jobs-automation-insight/amazon-scraps-secret-ai-recruiting-tool-that-showed-bias-against-women-idUSKCN1MK08G).
  • Floridi, L., Cowls, J., Beltrametti, M., & Chatila, R. (2018). AI4People — An Ethical Framework for a Good AI Society: Minds and Machines, 28(4), 689–707. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11023-018-9482-5
  • Loebbecke, C., and Picot, A. 2015. “Reflections on Societal and Business Model Transformation Arising from Digitization and Big Data Analytics: A Research Agenda,” The Journal of Strategic Information Systems (24:3), pp. 149–157.
  • Mirbabaie, M., Stieglitz, S., Brünker, F., Hofeditz, L., Ross, B. & Frick, N. (2021). Understanding Collaboration with Virtual Assistants – The Role of Social Identity and the Extended Self. Business and Information Systems Engineering (BISE), 63, 21–37.
  • Russell, S. J., and Norvig, P. 2016. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, Pearson Education Limited.
  • Stieglitz, S., Mirbabaie, M., Kroll, T. & Marx, J. (2019). ‘Silence’ as a Strategy during a Corporate Crisis - The Case of Volkswagen’s ‘Dieselgate’. Internet Research (IR), 29(4), 921-939.
  • Yampolskiy, R. V. 2016. “Taxonomy of Pathways to Dangerous Artificial Intelligence,” in Workshops at the Thirtieth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence.

Kontakt:

Lennart Hofeditz

Digital Nudging to overcome hierarchy in organizations

Zielgruppe:

Master

Anforderungen:

Mixed Methods

Inhalte:

Hierarchies are omnipresent in organizations. They form the chain-of-command and sometimes provide the required stability in complex enterprise environments (Knight and Mehta 2017). (Hogg 2010) point out that given hierarchical power can alter people’s behavior. Despite positive intentions, it can easily lead to negative effects that hinder innovation (R. A. M. Mudambi 2011) and an organization's performance in general (Leavitt 2005; Meske et al. 2020). Digital nudging was suggested as a new way of guiding users towards to optimal decision. It seeks to optimize formerly negative decision-making processes and persuade the user towards the better decision (Weinmann et al. 2016). In the discipline of information systems, digital nudging was found to positively influence the user adoption (Gregor and Lee-Archer 2016; Thaler and Sunstein 2009) and effectiveness of application usage (Hummel and Maedche 2019). Nudging was applied in various contexts to verify positive influence on behavior (Meske and Potthoff 2017; Stieglitz et al. 2017). Yet, the application in the context of organizational hierarchy is missing. Research currently lacks the link between digital nudging in information systems and hierarchy in an organizational context. Thus, overcoming these hierarchical distances is both key and potentially benefiting from the new and subtle form of persuasion, digital nudging. First studies identified an accelerated effect of nudges when influenced by hierarchical power (Kretzer and Maedche 2018), however the opposite has not been elaborated on yet.
The study is a mixed-method study and has two parts. First, interviews with experts are conducted to find out what burdens exist with hierarchy. This will allow the validation of findings in literature that hierarchy forms an obstacle in the way towards an increased productivity in the digital age. In addition, the interviews should reveal what the examples and use cases are that hierarchy is impacting. This will contribute to the study by (1) verifying the hypothesis that hierarchy can be an inhibitor for productivity, (2) detailing out where the obstacles are (including their relative strength so prioritization is possible) and (3) what intentions of the interviewees are to overcome those obstacles. The interviews should be done with a target number of 12 participants conducted in an organization of at least around 100 employees. The second part is an experiment that will test a designed digital nudge, which was derived from the interviews. Depending on the interview outcomes, the strongest inhibitor for productivity should be chosen, preferably with backing from previous literature. This will allow the design based on the input from the interviews as well as previous research background and results. The nudge then should be tested at the same or another company in an automated way.

Literatur:

  • Gregor, S., and Lee-Archer, B. 2016. “The Digital Nudge in Social Security Administration,” International Social Security Review (69:3–4), pp. 63–83. (https://doi.org/10.1111/issr.12111).
  • Hogg, M. A. 2010. “Influence and Leadership,” in Handbook of Social Psychology, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470561119.socpsy002031).
  • Meske, C., Kissmer, T., and Stieglitz, S. 2020. “Bridging Formal Barriers in Digital Work Environments – Investigating Technology-Enabled Interactions across Organizational Hierarchies,” Telematics and Informatics (48), Elsevier Ltd. (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tele.2020.101342).
  • Stieglitz, S., Potthoff, T., and Kißmer, T. 2017. “Digital Nudging Am Arbeitsplatz,” HMD Praxis Der Wirtschaftsinformatik, Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden, pp. 1–12. (https://doi.org/10.1365/s40702-017-0367-5).

Kontakt:

Tobias Kissmer

Fake News on cross-platform social media

Target Group:

Bachelor/Master

Requirements:

Social Media Analytics, Data Mining, Machine Learning

Contents:

In recent years, social media has become a source to spread fake news, increasing mainly during the crisis like COVID-19 or events like an election. The dynamic of the spread of fake news is unpredictable. The trends of flow are different across multiple social media platform. In this thesis, the student can use labelled data from multiple platforms and analyse the content of the social media post and user behaviour. The thesis could aim to analyse the content similarity, network analysis and exchange of information across different social media platforms. The data is gathered using the AMUSED framework.
The thesis can be supervised and written in English only.

Literature:

  • Shahi GK, Dirkson A, Majchrzak TA. An exploratory study of covid-19 misinformation on twitter. arXiv preprint arXiv:2005.05710. 2020 May 12.
  • Shahi GK, Nandini D. FakeCovid--A Multilingual Cross-domain Fact Check News Dataset for COVID-19. arXiv preprint arXiv:2006.11343. 2020 Jun 19.
  • Kishore Shahi G. AMUSED: An Annotation Framework of Multi-modal Social Media Data. arXiv e-prints. 2020 Oct:arXiv-2010.

Contact:

Gautam Kishore Shahi

Trust-Worthiness of the fact-checking websites

Target Group:

Bachelor/Master

Requirements:

Social Media Analytics

Contents:

There is an increasing amount of fake news in the media, social media, and other web sources. In recent years much research has been done for fake news detection and debunking of fake news. In the last two decades, there is a tremendous increase in the spread of misinformation, leading to an escalation in the number of fact-checking institutions. Fact-checking websites can help to investigate claims and determine whether the information used in the articles is true or not. But the quality of the fact-checking websites is questionable. More than 213 fact-checking websites are working in 40+ languages. There is no standard protocol for fact-checking websites, and they do not publish their articles in a standard format which generates several conflicts. So there is a need to investigate the reliability of the fact-checked content. In this thesis, the aim is to analyse the fact-checked content from multiple sources and create fact-checking websites' reliability.

The thesis can be supervised and written in English only.

Literature:

  • Shahi GK, Dirkson A, Majchrzak TA. An exploratory study of covid-19 misinformation on twitter. arXiv preprint arXiv:2005.05710. 2020 May 12.
  • Shahi GK, Nandini D. FakeCovid--A Multilingual Cross-domain Fact Check News Dataset for COVID-19. arXiv preprint arXiv:2006.11343. 2020 Jun 19.
  • Kishore Shahi G. AMUSED: An Annotation Framework of Multi-modal Social Media Data. arXiv e-prints. 2020 Oct:arXiv-2010.
  • Shahi GK, Stieglitz S. FactCred: Credibility Assessment of Fact-Checking Websites.

Contact:

Gautam Kishore Shahi

Sciebo und Open Science: Soziotechnische Gestaltungsempfehlungen für ein verbessertes Management von Forschungsdaten

Zielgruppe:

Bachelor/Master

Anforderungen:

Qualitative Inhaltsanalyse

Inhalte:

Um dem Gedanken der offenen Wissenschaft zu folgen, wird ein präzises Forschungsdatenmanagement (RDM) immer wichtiger. Mit dem Aufkommen datenintensiver Forschungsmethoden geht der Wunsch nach offen zugänglichen Daten einher (Link et al., 2011). Die Open-Science-Idee ist aber nicht nur aus der intrinsischen Bereitschaft der Forscher, ihre Daten zu teilen, entstanden (Wilms, Stieglitz, Buchholz, Vogl & Rudolph, 2018), sondern ist vielmehr auf die von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) veröffentlichten Richtlinien zurückzuführen. Eine Folge davon ist, dass Forschungseinrichtungen und Drittorganisationen begonnen haben, e-Science-Technologien wie Datenspeicher und digitale Forschungsumgebungen zu entwickeln (Kim & Zhang, 2015, Vogl et al., 2015). Auf operativer Ebene gibt es jedoch keine geeignete Infrastruktur und die Dienstleistungen sind nur unzureichend mit den RDM-Schritten verknüpft. Aus diesem Grund hat die Universität Duisburg-Essen in Zusammenarbeit mit der Universität Münster und Bielefeld begonnen, eine modulare RDM-Infrastruktur unter Berücksichtigung der bestehenden Dienste zu integrieren, um den offenen Wissenschaftsanspruch zu unterstützen (sciebo RDS). Ein wesentlicher Aspekt des Projekts ist die Entwicklung und Verbesserung niedrigschwelliger Dienste, die zu einer verstärkten Nutzung von RDM-Richtlinien bei potenziellen Nutzern führen werden.

Im Rahmen dieses von der DFG geförderten Projektes wurde eine erste begleitende Studie durchgeführt. Ziel dieser Studie war es, herauszufinden, unter welchen Bedingungen Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler aus verschiedenen Disziplinen den Empfehlungen des RDM folgen und entsprechende Dienste nutzen. Dazu wurde ein theoriegeleiteten Interviewleitfaden erstellt und 15 halbstrukturierte Experteninterviews durchgeführt. Ziel der Interviews war es, ein besseres Verständnis für den Umgang mit Forschungsdaten aus verschiedenen Disziplinen zu gewinnen und Vorschläge zu sammeln, wie die Berücksichtigung von RDM-Schritten durch eine geeignete Infrastruktur und bestehende Dienstleistungen verbessert werden kann. Außerdem wurde gefragt, welche technischen und psychologischen Mechanismen erfolgreich eingesetzt werden können, um das Bewusstsein für die offene Wissenschaftsidee zu erhöhen. Dabei wurden verschiedene hierarchische Positionen und verschiedene Forschungsdisziplinen von drei Universitäten abgefragt.

Auf Basis dieser Interviewdaten sollen in dieser Abschlussarbeit nun anhand der Actor-Network-Theory konkrete Handlungsempfehlungen zur Verbesserung des Managements von Forschungsdaten am Beispiel von Sciebo abgeleitet werden, die anschließend implementiert werden können.

Literatur:

  • Kim, Y., and Zhang, P. 2015. “Understanding data sharing behaviors of STEM researchers: The roles of attitudes, norms, and data repositories,” Library & Information Science Research, (37:3), pp. 189–200 (doi: 10.1016/J.LISR.2015.04.006).
  • Vogl R., Angenent H., Rudolph D., Thoring A., Schild C., Stieglitz S. and Meske C. 2015. „sciebo – the Campuscloud for NRW”, European Journal of Higher Education IT (EJHEIT) (2:3), pp. 1-12. (Winner of the Elite Award for Excellence).
  • Vogl, R., Rudolph, D., Thoring, A., Angenent, H., Stieglitz, S., & Meske, C. (2016). How to build a cloud storage service for half a million users in higher education: Challenges met and solutions found. Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2016–March, 5328–5337. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2016.658
  • Wilms, K., Brenger, B., López, A., Rehwald, S. (2018). Open Data in Higher Education – What Prevents Researchers from Sharing Research Data?. In: Proceedings of the 39th International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS).
  • Wilms, K., Meske, C., Stieglitz, S., Decker, H., Fröhlich, L., Jendrosch, N., Schaulies, S., Vogl, R. and Rudolph, D. (2017). Digital Transformation in Higher Education – New Cohorts, New Requirements?. In: Proceedings of the 23rd Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS)

Kontakt:

Lennart Hofeditz

Anti-Vaccination Infodemic: The role of counter movements in the discourse about the Covid-19 vaccination campaigns

Target Group:

Master

Requirements:

Social Media Analytics, Multimethod Approach (e.g. Social Network Analysis and Content / Discourse Analysis)

Contents:

Since February 2020, the world has faced the most serious pandemic since the Spanish flu. All over the world, people are urged to take protective measures: Keep your distance, follow the sneeze etiquette, wear a mask and wash your hands regularly. Some countries have also instituted stricter rules, such as closing various businesses and institutions or banning private meetings with people outside one's household (WHO, 2021).

A major hope to defeat the pandemic in the long term is the implementation of widespread vaccination campaigns. To this end, the production of vaccines has been promoted worldwide and central vaccination centers have been established.

While many citizens are eager to be vaccinated against Covid-19, there are other voices in the population that are very critical of vaccination and protective measures (Johnson et al. 2020). As the "Querdenker" movement in Germany has shown, the movement opposing pandemic response measures is very inhomogeneous. At their events the movement gathers people with clearly right- wing ideas, spiritualists who associate themselves with anthroposophical movements, among others, but also citizens with existential fears (Nachtwey et al. 2020).

In this master thesis it will be your task to analyse the online discourse on (anti-)vaccination campaigns. The aim is to get a more detailed picture of the camp of the “Querdenker” and anti- vaccination supporters and to show their connections and differences to each other. Most of the studies looking at anti-vaccination online movementes have been conducted with a special focus on the USA (Burki 2020, Germani et al. 2021). Of particular interest for this master thesis, since neglected in the discussion so far, are the Left-wing/Spiritual/Antroposophical movements (DW, 2020).

For your final project, you will engage with a social media dataset on the Covid-19 pandemic. The chair has a large dataset on Covid-19, but it is also possible to collect a more concrete dataset after your research in which certain identifiable hashtags, keywords, and accounts are present. In addition to the Twitter network, it is also possible to use a YouTube data set. Regarding the applied method you are free to combine different methods as a multi-method approach. Possible methods that you can combine with each other are e.g. a social network analysis, content analysis/discourse analysis, identification of opinion leaders.

The goal of your thesis will be to gain an overview of which actors contribute to anti-vaccine campaigns, which groups and opinion leaders do belong to this countermovement and do the members share a common group identity? Is the movement sharing a same goal and do they share a collective action network? How do they engage in the discourse on the vaccination campaigns in Germany?

Theoretical foundations for this study can be found especially in the field of online activism and collective action and identity, interesting starting points for reading can be (Mirbabaie et al. 2021, Leong et al. 2019, Bonilla and Rosa 2015, Kavada, 2015) The results of this study are of high importance from a scientific and societal perspective, as they can help to find out who controls anti-vaccination campaigns, what motivations are behind them and thus provide a starting point to protect the population from this dangerous misinformation.

Literature:

  • Anastasia Kavada (2015) Creating the collective: social media, the Occupy Movement and its constitution as a collective actor, Information, Communication & Society, 18:8, 872-886, DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2015.1043318
  • BONILLA, Y. and ROSA, J. (2015), #Ferguson: Digital protest, hashtag ethnography, and the racial politics of social media in the United States. American Ethnologist, 42: 4-17. https://doi.org/10.1111/amet.12112
  • Carmen Leong, Shan L. Pan, Shamshul Bahri & Ali Fauzi (2019) Social media empowerment in social movements: power activation and power accrual in digital activism, European Journal of Information Systems, 28:2, 173-204, DOI: 10.1080/0960085X.2018.1512944
  • Milad Mirbabaie, Felix Brünker, Magdalena Wischnewski, and Judith Meinert. 2021. The Development of Connective Action during Social Movements on Social Media. Trans. Soc. Comput. 4, 1, Article 3 (April 2021), 21 pages. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/3446981
  • Talha Burki, The online anti-vaccine movement in the age of COVID-19, The Lancet Digital Health, Volume 2, Issue 10, 2020, Pages e504-e505, https://doi.org/10.1016/S2589-7500(20)30227-2.
  • Germani F, Biller-Andorno N (2021)The anti-vaccination infodemicon socialmedia: A behavioralanalysis.PLoSONE 16(3):e0247642.https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0247642
  • Johnson, N.F., Velásquez, N., Restrepo, N.J. et al. The online competition between pro- and anti- vaccination views. Nature 582, 230–233 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2281-1
  • WHO (2021) https://covid19.who.int/
  • Deutsche Welle (2020) https://www.dw.com/en/meet-germanys-querdenker-covid-protest- movement/a-57049985
  • Nachtwey O., Schäfer, R., Frei N. (2020) Politische Soziologie Coronaproteste. Preprint. https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/zyp3f

Contact:

Anna-Katharina Jung

Themenfelder für Abschlussarbeiten

Social-Media-Analytics

  • Automatisierte Kommunikation in Social Media -- Kontakt & Kontakt
  • Social Bots - Wirkung und Bedeutung -- Kontakt 
  • Echokammern und Filterblasen in sozialen Netzwerken -- Kontakt

Communication and Collaboration

  • Conversational Agents in virtueller Kollaboration -- Kontakt & Kontakt
  • Einsatz und Nutzung von Künstlicher Intelligenz (in Unternehmen) -- Kontakt