IVG-RF Winter semester lectures 2020/2021

 

                                                                                                                       Information about COVID-19

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Winter termRheology and rheometry of liquids and suspensions

Colloidal products are omnipresent in our daily life but also essential for new and sustainable technologies. For mastering them, an in-depth understanding of their flow behavior is required.

Learning Targets:            

After visiting the lecture, students understand hydrodynamic effects in the flow of non-colloidal particles and can use this as a starting point to interpret the flow of hard spheres and real dispersions, i.e., in the presence of repulsive and attractive interactions. Basics of time-dependent rheological effects (thixotropy) are known. The students know about the related measurement techniques and can discuss them concerning their advantages and disadvantages as well as about their system-specific boundary conditions.

Literature:          

  1. Mewis, N.J. Wagner: Colloidal suspension rheology, Cambridge University Press, 2012
  2. Irgens: Rheology and Non-Newtonian Fluids, Springer, 2014
  3. Lerche, R. Miller, M. Schäffler: Dispersionseigenschaften 2D-Rheologie, 3D-Rheologie, Stabilität, Eigenverlag Berlin-Potsdam, 2015
  4. Worthoff: Technische Rheologie, WILEY-VCH, Weinheim
  5. G. Mezger: Das Rheologiehandbuch, Vincentz Network, 2016
  6. A. Osswald: Polymer Rheology, Hanser Publishers, Munich
  7. N. Israelachvili: Intermolecular and surface forces, Academic press, 2011

More information here.

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Summer termFormulation, printing and coating technologies for particulate products

Particulate products almost always do not find their final application as powders, but have to be processed into (multi)functional thin films or layers. This applies in particular to energetic functional materials such as those used in fuel cells and batteries, but also LEDs and solar cells, i.e. applications in energy and process engineering as well as nanotechnology. The lecture will therefore cover the entire process chain from the formulation of printable inks to the coating process.

Learning Targets:

After attending the lecture, students will understand the complex relationships between suspending powders and formulating them into tailor-made inks. The desired properties of the latter can be associated with the specific boundary conditions of different printing and coating processes. Common methods for characterizing drying processes and particulate layers are also known and can be discussed with regard to their advantages and disadvantages.

Literature:

  1. Kistler, S.F., Schweizer, P.M. (Eds.), 1997. Liquid film coating: scientific principles and their technological implications. Chapman & Hall.
  2. Cohen, E.D., Gutoff, E.B., 1992. Modern Coating and Drying Technology. John Wiley & Sons.
  3. Meichsner, G., Mezger, T., Schröder, J., 2016, Lackeigenschaften messen und steuern
  4. Schweizer, P., Liquid Film Coating

More information here.